Playing an Interview

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I was lucky enough to sit down and interview a good friend and gamer, Dion. Who spends his time working at a game store, hanging with friends and always pushing himself to be better at the games he likes.

Here is part of the transcript of the interview:

James: You have multiple high-scores in multiple games, have you ever thought of competing at an international level?

Dion: I honestly don’t think I am good enough. Like don’t get me wrong, I would love to get sponsored and travel, representing Australia and a gaming company. I am just happy to hang around home, I like my job and I am happy with what I have, I feel it would be too much responsibility and it would take the fun out of the games.

James: You first picked up a controller when you were 2? What makes games so appealing for you?

Dion: Well that’s what my Dad told me and I was just in a trance ever since. The appeal is probably everything, if that makes sense. When you buy a game you always want to see what is going to happen next. Like if you were to watch a TV series or read a book, you always want to see how it ends. I always buy games; don’t always have time to play all the ones that I own but the ones I do play would be mainly due to the game-play. If I get sucked into a game and it keeps me entertained it is one of the best experiences.

James: One of your best games is Guitar Hero, but it has come at a cost?

Dion: Yeah, sadly. With Guitar Hero you need to have fast fingers, quick reflexes and the ability to multitask. You pretty much play the Guitar section from music. From all the effort needed to be good, I got arthritis in my hands and fingers. So when I get a new game I can’t play it for as long as I would as it starts to get painful, so it has affected my skills.

James: You have been playing games for over two decades, how much has changed from the games you use to play to the ones that are out now?

Dion:  I would say everything, like the graphics have changed, the game-play has changed, the fans have changed, and the companies have changed. The gaming industry is in constantly synchronization with the improvements of technology, so everything except the personalities like ‘Mario’ [Nintendo’s mascot] would change.

James: There has always been this idea that violence in video games causes aggression and violent behaviour in people. Have you experienced it or even believe it?

Dion: There have been studies that show that there is a link, so can’t really object to it. I would also put it to the expectation of changing technology. Like when you create a violent game, the next game has to be even more violent, and then if there is a competitor then that game has to be even more violent. I haven’t personally seen aggressive violence, like when you get a bunch of guys sitting around playing a multiplayer game there is going to be a little bit of banter, but nothing over the top.

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